Follow the new edition of EMAJ Magazine!

Screenshot of our new website http://www.emajmagazine.com

The whole team of EMAJ Magazine is happy to introduce you its new website and invites you to follow it!

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Communication Solutions for people of Egypt

By Assaad Thebian

Do you want to follow the news on Egypt or share your pictures and experience? Here are some tips on where to look and how to bypass the blockade.

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“Even my mom will demonstrate tomorrow”

@Women of Egypt Facebook group

By Marina Ferhatovic

It is not only men’s revolution, assures 25-year-old Dareen Khalifa, who has been demonstrating since day one.

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Photo Album: Egyptians Protest in New York to End Military Rule

@nasry

By Nasry Esmat

About 1500 protesters,mostly Egyptian Americans, rallied in New York city on Saturday afternoon to show solidarity with protests in Egypt asking to bring down president Hosni Mubarak who has been in his position for 30 years.

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Latest photos from BBC Arabic : Egypt Uprising

BBC Arabic reporter

After blocking all sorts of communication by the Egyptian government on Friday including landline, cell phones, and Internet, some TV stations managed to get video reports from Cairo, here are some of the latest photos from these videos that were broadcast few minutes ago.

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Young Egyptian: “I am the only one online”

@Facebook

By Marina Ferhatovic

EGYPT. Phones and internet are down in Egypt. But Hossam, a young journalist from Cairo, has managed to connect through a proxy server and to answer some questions through the Facebook chat, shortly before the Friday prayer. Continue reading

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The Tunisian Online Revolution*

@hibr.me

By Assaad Thebian

The article was previously published on hibr.me

The “Jasmine Revolution” or “Cactus Revolution” (names of the ongoing Tunisian Revolution) crowns years of efforts by activists. These activists have used social media in order to get their voice out and show the people around the world what is happening in their “green” (Tunisia nickname) home. In May 2010, a huge campaign called “Free From 404” (Internet language for file not found) was carried out in Tunisia. Twitter hashtags, Facebook profile pictures, articles and videos were created to demonstrate the activists’ refusal of censorship. Continue reading

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